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Data from: Are there synergistic or antagonistic effects of multiple maternally-derived egg components (antibodies and testosterone) on offspring phenotype?

Citation

Torres, Roxana; Chin, Eunice; Rampton, Rowan; Williams, Tony D. (2019), Data from: Are there synergistic or antagonistic effects of multiple maternally-derived egg components (antibodies and testosterone) on offspring phenotype?, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.j348s75

Abstract

Eggs are multivariate in that they contain multiple maternally-derived egg components (e.g. hormones, antibodies, mRNA, antioxidants) which are thought to influence offspring phenotype. However, most studies have focused on single egg components and on short-term effects. Here, we simultaneously manipulated two egg components, maternally-derived antibodies (MAb) and yolk testosterone (T) to assess potential synergistic or antagonistic effects on offspring phenotype from hatching to sexual maturity. We found no evidence for short-or long-term effects of either MAb or yolk T alone, or their interaction, on hatching mass, size at fledging (tarsus), body mass at sexual maturity (day 82), chick survival, humoral immune function, or any measured female reproductive trait at sexual maturity. There was a positive effect of yolk T, but not MAb, on offspring PHA response at 26 days of age but at 82 days of age MAb, but not yolk T, had a positive effect on PHA response. There was also a MAbsex interaction on 30 day chick mass, and a positive effect of yolk T on male courtship behaviour at sexual maturity. However, we found no evidence for synergy, i.e. where offspring treated both with MAb and yolk T had higher trait values than offspring treated with either MAb or yolk T alone for any measured trait. Similarly, evidence for antagonistic (compensatory) effects, where offspring treated both with MAb and yolk T had intermediate trait values compared with offspring treated with either MAb or yolk T alone, was equivocal.

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