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Data from: Adaptation to resistant hosts increases fitness on susceptible hosts in the plant parasitic nematode Globodera pallida

Citation

Fournet, Sylvain et al. (2017), Data from: Adaptation to resistant hosts increases fitness on susceptible hosts in the plant parasitic nematode Globodera pallida, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.j9j02

Abstract

Trade-offs between virulence (defined as the ability to infect a resistant host) and life-history traits are of particular interest in plant pathogens for durable management of plant resistances. Adaptation to plant resistances (i.e., virulence acquisition) is indeed expected to be associated with a fitness cost on susceptible hosts. Here, we investigated whether life-history traits involved in the fitness of the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida are affected in a virulent lineage compared to an avirulent one. Both lineages were obtained from the same natural population through experimental evolution on resistant and susceptible hosts, respectively. Unexpectedly, we found that virulent lineages were more fit than avirulent lineages on susceptible hosts: they produced bigger cysts, containing more larvae and hatching faster. We thus discuss possible reasons explaining why virulence did not spread into natural G. pallida populations.

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