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Data from: Microbial community composition interacts with local abiotic conditions to drive colonization resistance in human gut microbiome samples

Citation

Baumgartner, Michael; Pfrunder-Cardozo, Katia; Hall, Alex (2021), Data from: Microbial community composition interacts with local abiotic conditions to drive colonization resistance in human gut microbiome samples, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.j9kd51cb9

Abstract

Biological invasions can alter ecosystem stability and function, and predicting what happens when a new species or strain arrives remains a major challenge in ecology. In the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, susceptibility of the resident microbial community to invasion by pathogens has important implications for host health. However, at the community level, it is unclear whether susceptibility to invasion depends mostly on resident community composition (which microbes are present), or also on local abiotic conditions (such as nutrient status). Here, we used a gut microcosm system to disentangle some of the drivers of susceptibility to invasion in microbial communities sampled from humans. We found resident microbial communities inhibited an invading E. coli strain, compared to community-free control treatments, sometimes excluding the invader completely (colonization resistance). These effects were stronger at later time points, coinciding with shifts in microbial community composition and nutrient availability. By separating these two components (microbial community and abiotic environment), we found taxonomic composition played a crucial role in suppressing invasion, but this depended critically on local abiotic conditions (adapted communities were more suppressive in nutrient-depleted conditions). This helps predict when resident communities will be most susceptible to invasion, with implications for optimizing treatments based around microbiota management.