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Data from: Luminance-dependent visual processing enables moth flight in low light

Citation

Sponberg, Simon; Dyhr, Jonathan P.; Hall, Robert W.; Daniel, Thomas L. (2016), Data from: Luminance-dependent visual processing enables moth flight in low light, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.jd7b9

Abstract

Animals must operate under an enormous range of light intensities. Nocturnal and twilight flying insects are hypothesized to compensate for dim conditions by integrating light over longer times. This slowing of visual processing would increase light sensitivity but should also reduce movement response times. Using freely hovering moths tracking robotic moving flowers, we showed that the moth’s visual processing does slow in dim light. These longer response times are consistent with models of how visual neurons enhance sensitivity at low light intensities, but they could pose a challenge for moths feeding from swaying flowers. Dusk-foraging moths avoid this sensorimotor tradeoff; their nervous systems slow down but not so much as to interfere with their ability to track the movements of real wind-blown flowers.

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