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Data from: Local adaptation for enhanced salt tolerance reduces non-adaptive plasticity caused by osmotic stress

Citation

Albecker, Molly A; McCoy, Michael W (2019), Data from: Local adaptation for enhanced salt tolerance reduces non-adaptive plasticity caused by osmotic stress, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.k0512c7

Abstract

Organisms often respond to environmental change via phenotypic plasticity, where an individual modulates its phenotype according to the environment. Highly variable or changing environments can exceed physiological limits and generate maladapted plastic phenotypes, which is termed non-adaptive plasticity. In some cases, selection may reduce the negative or disruptive impacts of environmental stress and produce locally adapted populations. Salt is an increasingly prevalent contaminant of freshwater systems and can induce non-adaptive plastic phenotypes for freshwater organisms like amphibians. Hyla cinerea is a frog species with populations inhabiting brackish, coastal habitats, so we use this species to test whether coastal populations are locally adapted to tolerate saltwater by determining how salt exposure during the embryonic and larval stages alters mortality and plastic developmental and metamorphic phenotypes of coastal and inland populations. Coastal frogs have higher survival, faster growth rates, and metamorphose sooner than inland frogs across salinities. Coastal frogs also metamorphose smaller (likely a consequence of earlier metamorphosis) yet maintain constant size, while higher salinities reduce metamorphic size for inland frogs. Coastal frogs evolved to minimize non-adaptive and disruptive impacts of saltwater during larval development and accelerate the larval period to reduce time spent in a stressful environment.

Usage Notes

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: 1701690

Location

North Carolina