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Data from: Host conservatism, geography, and elevation in the evolution of a Neotropical moth radiation

Citation

Jahner, Joshua P. et al. (2017), Data from: Host conservatism, geography, and elevation in the evolution of a Neotropical moth radiation, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.k0gq6

Abstract

The origins of evolutionary radiations are often traced to the colonization of novel adaptive zones, including unoccupied habitats or unutilized resources. For herbivorous insects, the predominant mechanism of diversification is typically assumed to be a shift onto a novel lineage of host plants. However, other drivers of diversification are important in shaping evolutionary history, especially for groups residing in regions with complex geological histories. We evaluated the contributions of shifts in host plant clade, bioregion, and elevation to diversification in Eois (Lepidoptera: Geometridae), a hyper-diverse genus of moths found throughout the Neotropics. Relationships among 107 taxa were reconstructed using one mitochondrial and two nuclear genes. In addition, we used a genotyping-by-sequencing approach to generate 4,641 SNPs for 137 taxa. Both data sets yielded similar phylogenetic histories, with relationships structured by host plant clade, bioregion, and elevation. While diversification of basal lineages often coincided with host clade shifts, more recent speciation events were more typically associated with shifts across bioregions or elevational gradients. Overall, patterns of diversification in Eois are consistent with the perspective that shifts across multiple adaptive zones synergistically drive diversification in hyper-diverse lineages.

Usage Notes

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: DEB-1145609 DEB-1442103

Location

South America
Central America
Central American Seaway
Andes Mountains