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Data from: A host immune hormone modifies parasite species interactions and epidemics: insights from a field manipulation.

Citation

Halliday, Fletcher W.; Umbanhowar, James; Mitchell, Charles E. (2018), Data from: A host immune hormone modifies parasite species interactions and epidemics: insights from a field manipulation., Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.k455v5c

Abstract

Parasite epidemics can depend on priority effects, and parasite priority effects can result from the host immune response to prior infection. Yet we lack experimental evidence that such immune-mediated priority effects influence epidemics. To address this research gap, we manipulated key host immune hormones, then measured the consequences for within-host parasite interactions, and ultimately parasite epidemics in the field. Specifically, we applied plant immune-signaling hormones to sentinel plants, embedded into a wild host population, and tracked foliar infections caused by two common fungal parasites. Within host individuals, priority effects were altered by the immune-signaling hormone, salicylic acid. Scaling up from within-host interactions, hosts treated with salicylic acid experienced lower prevalence of a less aggressive parasite, increased burden of infection by a more aggressive parasite, and experienced fewer coinfections. Together, these results indicate that by altering within-host priority effects, host immune hormones can drive parasite epidemics. This study therefore experimentally links host immune hormones to within-host priority effects and parasite epidemics, advancing a more mechanistic understanding of how interactions among parasites alter their epidemics.

Usage Notes

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: DEB-1015909