Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: Evaluating population genomic candidate genes underlying flowering time in Arabidopsis thaliana using T-DNA insertion lines

Citation

Chong, Veronica K.; Stinchcombe, John R. (2019), Data from: Evaluating population genomic candidate genes underlying flowering time in Arabidopsis thaliana using T-DNA insertion lines, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.k5r20q0

Abstract

Population genomic scans have emerged as a powerful tool to detect regions of the genome that are potential targets of selection. Despite the success of genomic scans in identifying novel lists of loci potentially underlying adaptation, few studies proceed to validate the function of these candidate genes. In this study, we used T-DNA insertion lines to evaluate the effects of 27 candidate genes on flowering time in North American accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana. We compared the flowering time of T-DNA insertion lines which knock-out the function of a candidate gene obtained from population genomic studies to a wildtype under long- and short-day conditions. We also did the same for a collection of randomly chosen genes that had not been identified as candidates. We validated the well-known effect of long-day conditions in accelerating flowering time and found that gene disruption caused by insertional mutagenesis tends to delay flowering. Surprisingly, we found that knockouts in random genes were just as likely to produce significant phenotypic effects as knockouts in candidate genes. T-DNA insertions at a handful of candidate genes that had previously been identified as outlier loci showed significant delays in flowering time under both long and short days, suggesting that they are promising candidates for future investigation.

Usage Notes