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Data from: Handover training for medical students – a controlled educational trial of a pilot curriculum

Citation

Thaeter, Laura et al. (2018), Data from: Handover training for medical students – a controlled educational trial of a pilot curriculum, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.k602576

Abstract

Background: Handovers are a critical point of patient care and a significant source of adverse events. The WHO patient safety curriculum provides some structure for handover teaching; in Europe, there is no standardized curriculum for undergraduate handover training. To address this, the Aachen Interdisciplinary Training Centre for Medical Education, developed and established a pilot curriculum for handover training in the context of the EU-funded PATIENT-project Objective: To develop and implement a handover curriculum for medical students and to assess its effect on students’ awareness, confidence and knowledge regarding patient safety and handover in multiple settings. Methods: The pilot handover training curriculum was designed following Kern´s principles of curriculum development and was integrated into a curricular course led by departments for anesthesiology and intensive care (AI) at the University Hospital. A controlled educational research study was conducted with 4th year medical students (n=147) who either received the standard existing curriculum (no teaching of handover, n=78) or the pilot handover training (n=69). Paper-based questionnaires regarding attitude, confidence and knowledge towards handover and patient safety were used for pre- and post-assessment. The pilot curriculum consisted of 3 units (1-2 hours each) integrated into a 4-week course of AI. Multiple types of handover (end-of-shift, operating room/post anesthesia recovery unit/ICU, telephone, discharge) were addressed. Results: Students showed a significant increase in knowledge (p<0.01) and self-confidence for the use of standardized handover tools (p<0.01) and accurate handover performance (p<0.01) among the pilot group. Discussion/Conclusion: We developed and implemented a pilot curriculum for undergraduate handover training. Students displayed a significant increase in knowledge and self-confidence for the use of standardized handover tools and accurate handover performance. An evaluation of the curriculum by other faculties is needed. Further studies should evaluate whether the observed effect of a specific handover strategy is associated with a patient benefit.

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