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Data from: Logical validation and evaluation of practical feasibility for the SCRuM (School Clinical Rugby Measure) test battery developed for young adolescent rugby players in a resource-constrained environment

Citation

Chiwaridzo, Matthew et al. (2018), Data from: Logical validation and evaluation of practical feasibility for the SCRuM (School Clinical Rugby Measure) test battery developed for young adolescent rugby players in a resource-constrained environment, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.kb8203f

Abstract

There is a growing impetus towards usage of test batteries in talent identification (TID) programmes in rugby. Consequently, there are many test batteries in existence profiling anthropometric, physiological characteristics and rugby-specific skills. There is no consensus in the literature on the constituent variables and corresponding tests required to inform TID programs. Following development of a new test battery called the SCRuM (School Clinical Rugby Measure), this study aimed at establishing face, logical validity and practical feasibility of included tests. The test battery, initially comprised of 23 items, had its face and logical validity evaluated by five (5) adolescent rugby coaches and 20 rugby experts, respectively. Logical validation was conducted in two questionnaire-based rounds with Content Validity Index (I-CVI) calculated for each variable. Subsequently, a cross-sectional study targeting 30 local rugby coaches was conducted to determine the perceived practical feasibility of each test item. The results showed excellent I-CVI (>0.78) for 17 variables (speed, weight, height and skin fold measures, repeated high-intensity exercise performance ability, prolonged high-intensity intermittent running ability, change of direction speed, anaerobic capacity, lower-and upper body muscular power and strength, muscular flexibility, reactive agility, passing for accuracy, tackling proficiency, and catching). However, three tests, namely, Reactive Agility, One Repetition Maximum Back Squat and One Repetition Maximum Bench Press had low test-feasibility indices (T-FI< 35) suggesting practicality concerns with implementation in the Zimbabwean context. Thus, these findings suggest the need for substitution or development of new practically feasible tests for upper-and lower body muscular strength and reactive agility.

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