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Maternal experiences, diabetes, postnatal maternal depression, and child social-emotional outcomes in a South African community cohort

Citation

Rayport, Yael K. et al. (2022), Maternal experiences, diabetes, postnatal maternal depression, and child social-emotional outcomes in a South African community cohort, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.kkwh70s73

Abstract

Previous literature has identified associations between diabetes during pregnancy and postnatal maternal depression. Both maternal conditions are associated with adverse consequences on childhood development. Despite an especially high prevalence of diabetes during pregnancy and maternal postnatal depression in low- and middle-income countries, related research predominates in high-income countries. In a South African cohort with or without diabetes, we investigated associations between adverse maternal experiences with postnatal maternal depression and child social-emotional outcomes. South African mother-child dyads were recruited from the Bishop Lavis community in Cape Town. Participants consisted of 82 mother-child dyads (53 women had GDM or type 2 diabetes). At 14–20 months postpartum, maternal self-report questionnaires were administered to assess household socioeconomic status, food insecurity, maternal depressive symptoms (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS)), maternal trauma (Life Events Checklist), and child social-emotional development (Brief Infant Toddler Social Emotional Assessment, Ages and Stages Questionnaires: Social-Emotional, Second Edition). Lower educational attainment, lower household income, food insecurity, living without a partner, and having experienced physical assault were each associated with postnatal maternal depressive symptoms and clinical maternal depression (EPDS > 13). Maternal postnatal depression, lower maternal educational attainment, lower household income, household food insecurity, and living in a single-parent household were each associated with child social-emotional problems. Stratified analyses revealed maternal experiences (education, income, food insecurity, trauma) were associated with postnatal maternal depressive symptoms and child social-emotional problems only among dyads with in utero exposure to diabetes. Women with pre-existing diabetes or gestational diabetes in LMIC settings should be screened for health-related social needs to reduce the prevalence of depression and to promote child social-emotional development.

Funding

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development K99/R00 Pathway to Independence Award, Award: K99HD103910