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Data from: Adverse events related to intravenous antibiotic therapy: a prospective observational study in the treatment of infective endocarditis

Citation

De Paula, Débora Holanda Gonçalves; Tura, Bernardo Rangel; Lamas, Cristiane da Cruz (2017), Data from: Adverse events related to intravenous antibiotic therapy: a prospective observational study in the treatment of infective endocarditis, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.kp064

Abstract

Objective: The goal of this prospective observational present study was to identify adverse events (AEs) related to the use of intravenous access sites for infective endocarditis (IE) treatment in a tertiary care hospital that can occur during patient care that cannot be attributed to the underlying disease and may result in lengthening of hospital stay or death. Design: This is an observational, analytical and prospective study on AEs resulting from the use of intravenous access sites in patients under antimicrobial treatment for IE. Patients enrolled in the International Collaboration on Endocarditis (ICE) study had their peripheral, short term central catheters (CVC) and peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) monitored for AEs. Setting: Tertiary care hospital for cardiac surgery in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Patients: Patients over 18 years of age, hospitalized in 2009 and 2010 with definite criteria for IE by the modified Duke criteria were included. Main outcome measures: Adverse events related to intravenous catheters: erythema and infiltration, fever, obstruction, externalization and blood stream infection. Results: Thirty-seven episodes of IE in 35 patients were studied. Mean age was 44.32 ± 15.2 years; 22 (63%) were male. 253 vascular catheters were studied, 148 peripheral, 85 CVC (21 of which for haemodialysis) and 20 PICC. The most frequent AEs were “erythema” and “infiltration” for peripheral catheters, “fever” for CVCs, and “obstruction” and “externalization” for PICCs. The number of catheter-days was 360 for peripheral catheters, 1.156 for CVC and 420 for PICC. Kaplan Meier curves for CVC and PICC showed statistical difference for obstruction (p<0.001) in PICCs. More bacteraemia occurred in CVC compared to PICC. Conclusion: The choice of intravenous access sites is critical in the treatment of IE. Close observation for adverse events and stricter implementation of infection control measures and better manipulation of catheters are suggested.

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