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Data from: The context dependent effects of host competence, competition, and the pathogen transmission mode on disease prevalence

Citation

Cortez, Michael; Duffy, Meghan (2021), Data from: The context dependent effects of host competence, competition, and the pathogen transmission mode on disease prevalence, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.kwh70rz27

Abstract

Biodiversity in communities is changing globally, including the gain and loss of host species in host-pathogen communities. Increased host diversity can cause infection prevalence in a focal host to increase (amplification) or decrease (dilution).  However, it is unclear what general rules govern the context dependent effects, in part because theories for pathogens with different transmission modes have developed largely independently.  Using a two-host model, we explore how the pathogen transmission mode and characteristics of a second host (disease competence and competitive ability) influence disease prevalence in a focal host.  Our work shows how the theories for pathogens with environmental transmission, density-dependent direct transmission, and frequency-dependent direct transmission can be unified.  Our work also identifies general rules about how host and pathogen characteristics affect amplification/dilution.  For example, higher competence hosts promote amplification, unless they are strong interspecific competitors; strong interspecific competitors promote dilution, unless they are large sources of new infections; and dilution occurs under frequency-dependent direct transmission more than density-dependent direct transmission, unless interspecific host competition is sufficiently strong.  Our work helps explain how the characteristics of the pathogen and a second host affect disease prevalence in a focal host.

Methods

These files are Maple and Matlab scripts for analyzing the model in "The context dependent effects of host competence, competition, and the pathogen transmission mode on disease prevalence" and generating the figures in that study. 

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: DEB-1748729

National Science Foundation, Award: DEB-2015280

National Science Foundation, Award: DEB-2015280