Skip to main content
Dryad

Data from: Distinct developmental trajectories for risky and impulsive decision-making in chimpanzees

Cite this dataset

Rosati, Alexandra; Emery Thompson, Melissa; Atencia, Rebeca; Buckholtz, Joshua (2022). Data from: Distinct developmental trajectories for risky and impulsive decision-making in chimpanzees [Dataset]. Dryad. https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.kwh70rz7d

Abstract

Human adolescence is characterized by a suite of changes in decision-making and emotional regulation that promote risky and impulsive behavior. Accumulating evidence suggests that behavioral and physiological shifts seen in human adolescence are shared by some primates, yet it is unclear if the same cognitive mechanisms are recruited. We examined developmental changes in risky choice, inter-temporal choice, and emotional responses to decision outcomes in chimpanzees, our closest-living relatives. We found that adolescent chimpanzees were more risk-seeking than adults, as in humans. However, chimpanzees showed no developmental change in inter-temporal choice, unlike humans, although younger chimpanzees did exhibit elevated emotional reactivity to waiting compared to adults. Comparisons of cortisol and testosterone indicated robust age-related variation in these biomarkers, and patterns of individual differences in choices, emotional reactivity, and hormones also supported a developmental dissociation between risk and choice impulsivity.  These results show that some but not all core features of human adolescent decision-making are shared with chimpanzees.

Methods

See methods in the manuscript for all details.

Usage notes

Please see the key tabs in the files for all details on data usage information.

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: 1944881

National Science Foundation, Award: 1926653

National Institute on Aging, Award: R01AG049395

Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, Award: FG‐2019‐12054