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Supplementary material of the article “Elevation patterns and critical environmental drivers of the taxonomic, functional and phylogenetic diversity of small mammals in a karst mountain area”.

Citation

Sun, Jian et al. (2021), Supplementary material of the article “Elevation patterns and critical environmental drivers of the taxonomic, functional and phylogenetic diversity of small mammals in a karst mountain area”., Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.m37pvmd0c

Abstract

Understanding how biodiversity components are related under different environmental factors is a fundamental challenge for ecology studies, yet there is little knowledge of this interplay among the biotas, especially small mammals, in karst mountain areas. Here, we examine the elevation patterns of the taxonomic diversity (TD), phylogenetic diversity (PD) and functional diversity (FD) of small mammals in a karst mountain area, the Wuling Mountains, Southwest China, and compare these patterns between taxa (Rodentia and Eulipotyphla) and scales (broad- and narrow-range species). We also disentangle the impacts of the human influence index, net primary productivity (NPP), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), annual precipitation (AP), and annual mean temperature (AMT) on these three facets of biodiversity by using structural equation modeling. We recorded a total of 39 small mammal species, including 26 rodents and 13 species of the order Eulipotyphla. Our study shows that the facets of biodiversity are spatially incongruent. Net primary productivity has a positive effect on the three facets for most groups, while the effect of the normalized difference vegetation index is negative for TD and PD in most groups. Annual mean temperature and annual precipitation have negative effects on FD and PD, whereas TD is dependent on the species range scale. The human influence index effect on TD and PD also depends on the species range scale. These findings provide robust evidence that the ecological drivers of biodiversity differ among different biotas and different range scales, and future research should use multi-facet approach to determine biodiversity conservation strategies.

Funding

Second Tibetan Plateau Scientific Expedition and Research Program, Award: 2019QZKK0501

Second Tibetan Plateau Scientific Expedition and Research Program, Award: 2019QZKK0402

National Natural Science Foundation of China, Award: 31801964

National Natural Science Foundation of China, Award: 31872958

Chinese Academy of Sciences, Award: President’s International Fellowship Initiative 2018PB0040

Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Award: Y229YX5105

National Special Fund on Basic Research of Science and Technology in China, Award: 2014FY110100

Second Tibetan Plateau Scientific Expedition and Research Program, Award: 2019QZKK0501

Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Award: Y229YX5105

National Special Fund on Basic Research of Science and Technology in China, Award: 2014FY110100