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Data from: Estimating costs of aphid resistance to parasitoids conferred by a protective strain of the bacterial endosymbiont Regiella insecticola

Citation

Jamine, Anine R.; Vorburger, Christoph (2019), Data from: Estimating costs of aphid resistance to parasitoids conferred by a protective strain of the bacterial endosymbiont Regiella insecticola, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.m464p56

Abstract

Heritable bacterial endosymbionts are common in aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae), and they can influence ecologically important traits of their hosts. It is generally assumed that their persistence in a population is dependent on a balance between the costs and benefits they confer. A good example is Hamiltonella defensa Moran et al., a facultative symbiont that provides a benefit by strongly increasing aphid resistance to parasitoid wasps, but becomes costly to the host in the absence of parasitoids. Regiella insecticola Moran et al. is another common symbiont of aphids and generally does not influence resistance to parasitoids. In the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer), however, one strain (R5.15) was discovered that behaves like H. defensa in that it provides strong protection against parasitoid wasps. Here we compare R5.15-infected and uninfected lines of three M. persicae clones to test whether this protective symbiont is costly as well, i.e., whether it has any negative effects on aphid life-history traits. Furthermore, we transferred R5.15 to two other aphid species, the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris), and the black bean aphid, Aphis fabae Scopoli, where this strain is also protective against parasitoids and where we could compare its effects with those of additional, non-protective strains of R. insecticola. Negative effects of R5.15 on host survival and lifetime reproduction were limited and frequently non-significant, and these effects were comparable or in one case weaker than those of R. insecticola strains that are not protective against parasitoid wasps. Unless the benefit of protection is counteracted by detrimental effects on traits that were not considered in this study, R. insecticola strain R5.15 should have a high potential to spread in aphid populations.

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Australia
Central Europe
North America