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Data from: Starvation effects on nitrogen and carbon stable isotopes of animals: an insight from meta-analysis of fasting experiments

Citation

Doi, Hideyuki; Akamatsu, Fumikazu; González, Angélica L. (2017), Data from: Starvation effects on nitrogen and carbon stable isotopes of animals: an insight from meta-analysis of fasting experiments, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.m53q0

Abstract

Nitrogen and carbon stable isotopic compositions (δ15N and δ13C) of consumers have been used for physiological and food web studies. Previous studies have shown δ15N and δ13C values are affected by several biological and environmental factors during starvation, but the generality of the effect of starvation on δ15N and δ13C values has not yet been tested. Here, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the effects of starvation on δ15N and δ13C values of consumers, and the underlying factors that may explain the observed variation. The δ15N and δ13C values were calculated as the differences between the final δ15N and δ13C values of consumers (post-starvation) and the pre-starvation values on each experiment. Our meta-analysis showed a large variation in the δ15N and δ13C values of consumers (δ15N range: –0.82 to 4.30‰; mean: 0.47‰ and δ13C range: –1.92 to 2.62‰; mean: 0.01‰). The δ15N values of most consumers increased along the length of the starvation period and were influenced by nitrogen excretion and thermoregulation types, probably because differences in nitrogen metabolism and thermoregulation affect nitrogen processing and excretion rates. None of our predictor variables accounted for the variation in δ13C values, which showed both increases and decreases due to fasting. Our findings suggest that starvation results in changes in consumer δ15N values which are mainly explained by the length of the fasting period and by nitrogen and energy metabolism, but the underlying mechanisms of the starvation effects on δ13C values seem to be more complex than previously thought.

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