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Data from: Biochar application on paddy and purple soils in southern China: soil carbon and biotic activity

Citation

Yan, Shen (2019), Data from: Biochar application on paddy and purple soils in southern China: soil carbon and biotic activity, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.m5j1rs3

Abstract

Soil carbon reserves are the largest terrestrial carbon pools. Common agricultural practices, such as high fertilization rates and intensive crop rotation, have led to global-scale environmental changes, including decreased soil organic matter, lower carbon/nitrogen ratios, and disruption of soil carbon pools. These changes have resulted in a decrease in soil microbial activity, severe reduction in soil fertility, and transformation of soil nutrients, thereby causing soil nutrient imbalance, which seriously affects crop production. In this study, 16S rDNA-based analysis and static chamber-gas chromatography were used to elucidate the effects of continuous application of straw biochar on soil carbon pools and the soil microbial environments of two typical soil types (purple and paddy soils) in southern China. Application of biochar (1) improved the soil carbon pool and its activity, (2) significantly promoted the release of soil CO2, and (3) improved the soil carbon environment. Soil carbon content was closely correlated with the abundance of organisms belonging to two orders, Lactobacillales and Bacteroidales, and, more specifically, to the genus Lactococcus. These results suggest that biochar affects the soil carbon environment and soil microorganism abundance, which in turn may improve the soil carbon pool.

Usage Notes

Location

美国
Southern China