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Data from: Colonization and demographic expansion of freshwater fauna across the Hawaiian Archipelago

Citation

Alda, Fernando et al. (2016), Data from: Colonization and demographic expansion of freshwater fauna across the Hawaiian Archipelago, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.n21f4

Abstract

It is widely accepted that insular terrestrial biodiversity progresses with island age because colonization and diversification proceed over time. Here we assess whether this principle extends to oceanic island streams. We examined range-wide mtDNA sequence variation in four stream-dwelling species across the Hawaiian archipelago to characterize the relationship between colonization and demographic expansion, and to determine whether either factor reflects island age. We found that colonization and demographic expansion are not related and that neither correspond to island age. The snail Neritina granosa exhibited the oldest colonization time (~2.713 mya) and time since demographic expansion (~282 kya), likely reflecting a preference for lotic habitats most prevalent on young islands. Conversely, gobioid fishes (Awaous stamineus, Eleotris sandwicensis and Sicyopterus stimpsoni) colonized the archipelago only ~0.411-0.935 mya, suggesting ecological opportunities for colonization in this group were temporally constrained. These findings indicate that stream communities form across colonization windows, underscoring the importance of ecological opportunities in shaping island freshwater diversity.

Usage Notes

Location

Hawaii