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Data from: The effect of larval diet on adult survival, swarming activity and copulation success in male Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae)

Citation

Lang, Bethan J. et al. (2018), Data from: The effect of larval diet on adult survival, swarming activity and copulation success in male Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae), Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.n26r0

Abstract

Control of Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae) populations is vital for reducing the transmission of several pervasive human diseases. The success of new vector control technologies will be influenced by the fitness of laboratory-reared transgenic males. However, there has been relatively little published data on how rearing practices influence male fitness in Aedes mosquitoes. In the laboratory, the effect of larval food availability on adult male fitness was tested, using a range of different fitness measures. Larval food availability was demonstrated to be positively correlated with adult body size. Larger males survived longer and exhibited greater swarming activity. As a consequence, larger males may have more mating opportunities in the wild. However, we also found that within a swarm larger males did not have an increased likelihood of copulating with a female. The outcome of the mating competition experiments depended on the methodology used to mark the males. These results show that fitness assessment can vary depending on the measure analyzed, and the methodology used to determine it. Continued investigation into these fitness measures and methodologies, and critically, their utility for predicting male performance in the field, will increase the efficiency of vector control programs.

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