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Data from: Driving factors on greenhouse gas emissions in permafrost region of Daxing’an Mountains, Northeast China

Citation

Gao, Weifeng; Gao, Dawen; Cai, Tijiu; Liang, Hong (2022), Data from: Driving factors on greenhouse gas emissions in permafrost region of Daxing’an Mountains, Northeast China, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.n2z34tmz7

Abstract

Permafrost regions are an important source of greenhouse gases. However, the effects of different permafrost wetland types on greenhouse gas emissions and the driving factors are still unclear in the permafrost region. Here, we selected three typical permafrost wetlands from the Daxing’an Mountains to investigate the effects of permafrost wetland types on greenhouse gas emissions. The cumulative N2O, CO2, and CH4 emissions were 84–122, 657,942–1,446,121, and 173–16,924 kg km−2, respectively. The linear mixed effects model indicated that N2O emissions were significantly affected by the NO3-N content, whereas CO2 emissions were mainly driven by soil temperature, water table level, and NO3-N content. CH4 emissions were affected by soil temperatue and water table level. Permafrost wetland types significantly affected the average and cumulative N2O, CO2, and CH4 emissions. The cumulative N2O emissions were highest in the Larix gmelinii - Carex appendiculata (LC) wetland and lowest in the Betula fruticosa Pall. (B) wetland, driven by NO3-N content. The cumulative CO2 emissions were highest in the (B) wetland and lowest in the L. gmelinii - Ledum palustre var. dilatatum (LL) wetland. The cumulative CH4 emissions from B wetland were significantly higher than those from LL and LC wetlands. The differences in cumulative CO2 and CH4 emissions were driven by the water table level. Our findings indicate that NO3-N content affect the spatial-temporal variation of N2O emissions, whereas water table level influence the spatial-temporal variation of CO2 and CH4 emissions in the permafrost region of the Daxing’an Mountains.

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