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Data from: Total duplication of the small single copy region in the angiosperm plastome: rearrangement and inverted repeat instability in Asarum

Citation

Sinn, Brandon Tyler; Sedmak, Dylan D.; Kelly, Lawrence M.; Freudenstein, John V. (2018), Data from: Total duplication of the small single copy region in the angiosperm plastome: rearrangement and inverted repeat instability in Asarum, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.n976p

Abstract

Premise of the Study: As more plastomes are assembled, it is evident that rearrangements, losses, intergenic spacer expansion and contraction, and syntenic breaks within otherwise functioning plastids are more common than was thought previously, and such changes have developed independently in disparate lineages. However, to date, the magnoliids remain characterized by their highly conserved plastid genomes (plastomes). Methods: Illumina HiSeq and MiSeq platforms were used to sequence the plastomes of Saruma henryi and those of representative species from each of the six taxonomic sections of Asarum. Sequenced plastomes were compared in a phylogenetic context provided by maximum likelihood and parsimony inferences made using an additional 18 publicly available plastomes from early‐diverging angiosperm lineages. Key Results: In contrast to previously published magnoliid plastomes and the newly sequenced Saruma henryi plastome published here, Asarum plastomes have undergone extensive disruption and contain extremely lengthy AT‐repeat regions. The entirety of the small single copy region (SSC) of A. canadense and A. sieboldii var. sieboldii has been incorporated into the inverted repeat regions (IR), and the SSC of A. delavayi is only 14 bp long. All sampled Asarum plastomes share an inversion of a large portion of the large single copy region (LSC) such that trnE‐UUC is adjacent to the LSC‐IR boundary. Conclusions: Plastome divergence in Asarum appears to be consistent with trends seen in highly rearranged plastomes of the monocots and eudicots. We propose that plastome instability in Asarum is due to repetitive motifs that serve as recombinatory substrates and reduce genome stability.

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Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: DEB-1406732