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Evaluating livestock farmers' knowledge, beliefs, and management of arboviral diseases in Kenya

Cite this dataset

Nyangau, Paul; Nzuma, Jonathan; Irungu, Patrick; Kassie, Menale (2022). Evaluating livestock farmers' knowledge, beliefs, and management of arboviral diseases in Kenya [Dataset]. Dryad. https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.ngf1vhhtt

Abstract

Globally, arthropod-borne virus (arbovirus) infections continue to pose substantial threats to public health and economic development, especially in developing countries. In Kenya, although arboviral diseases (ADs) are largely endemic, little is known about the factors influencing livestock farmers’ knowledge, beliefs, and management (KBM) of the three major ADs: Rift Valley fever (RVF), dengue fever and chikungunya fever. This study evaluates the drivers of livestock farmers’ KBM of ADs from a sample of 629 respondents selected using a three-stage sampling procedure in Kenya’s three hotspot counties of Baringo, Kwale, and Kilifi. 

Methods

A multistage sampling technique was used to select 629 respondents for a survey of their KBM of ADs in their locale. In the first stage, the three ADs hotspot counties (Baringo, Kilifi, and Kwale) were purposively selected. In the second stage, purposive sampling was also used to select the most ADs-prone sub-counties (decentralized units within a county) in each of the three counties resulting in three study sites of Marigat in Baringo, Malindi, Kilifi South and North in Kilifi and Msambweni in Kwale. A sampling frame of all households in the three study sites was obtained from the local administration (chiefs and village elders). In the third stage, a simple random sampling technique was used to select 200 households from each study site giving a total sample of 629 households after adjusting for 10 percent of the non-responses.  Well-trained enumerators undertook face-to-face interviews through a pre-tested semi-structured questionnaire using CSPro version 7.5 electronic data collection software and later exported to STATA software.

Funding

Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Award: JU2857/9-1