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Data from: Phylogenetic conservatism and biogeographic affinity influence woody plant species richness-climate relationships in eastern Eurasia

Citation

Su, Xiangyan et al. (2020), Data from: Phylogenetic conservatism and biogeographic affinity influence woody plant species richness-climate relationships in eastern Eurasia, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.nk98sf7qh

Abstract

Mechanisms underlying species richness patterns remain a central yet controversial issue in biology. Climate has been regarded as a major determinant of species richness. However, the relative influences of different evolutionary processes, (i.e. niche conservatism, diversification rate, and time for speciation) on species richness-climate relationships remain to be tested. Here, using newly compiled distribution maps for 11,422 woody plant species in eastern Eurasia, we estimated species richness patterns for all species and for families with tropical and temperate affinities separately, and explored the phylogenetic signals in species richness patterns of different families and their relationships with contemporary climate and climate change since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). We further compared the effects of niche conservatism (represented by contemporary-ancestral climate niches differences), diversification rate and time for speciation (represented by family age) on variation in the slopes of species richness-climate relationships. We found that winter coldness was the best predictor for species richness patterns of most tropical families while Quaternary climate change was the best predictor for those of most temperate families. Species richness patterns of closely-related families were more similar than those of distantly-related families within eudicots, and significant phylogenetic signals characterized the slopes of species richness-climate relationships across all angiosperm families. Contemporary-ancestral climate niche differences dominated variation in the relationships between family-level species richness and most climate variables. Our results indicate significant phylogenetic conservatism in family-level species richness patterns and their relationships with contemporary climate within eudicots. These findings shed light on the mechanisms underlying large-scale species richness patterns and suggest that ancestral climatic niche may influence the evolution of species richness-climate relationships in plants through niche conservatism.

Usage Notes

Appendix S4_supp_Distributional Data for each family and climate data

In this file we provided the distribution of species richness of all woody plants, woody plants of tropical affnity, woody plants of temperate affinity, woody plants of each family and the climate data in each grid cell in eastern Eurasia

Funding

National Key Research and Development Program of China, Award: 2017YFA0605101

National Key Research and Development Program of China, Award: 2018YFA0606104

National Natural Science Foundation of China, Award: 31988102

National Natural Science Foundation of China, Award: 31911530102