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Data from: Long fusion correction of degenerative adult spinal deformity and the selection of the upper or lower thoracic region as the site of proximal instrumentation: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Citation

Fu, Xin et al. (2016), Data from: Long fusion correction of degenerative adult spinal deformity and the selection of the upper or lower thoracic region as the site of proximal instrumentation: a systematic review and meta-analysis, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.ns5hr

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to compare outcomes when the upper and lower thoracic regions were used as the site of proximal instrumentation to treat adult spinal deformity. Methods: Medline, Embase and Cochrane library searches were performed to identify studies that compared outcome measures when the upper and lower thoracic vertebrae (UTV and LTV, respectively) were used as the site of proximal instrumentation. The weighted mean difference (WMD) was calculated for continuous outcomes, and the relative risk (RR) was calculated for dichotomous outcomes. Results: Seven articles (n=554patients) met the final inclusion criteria, and we compared the outcome measures of a long fusion extending to the upper and lower thoracic regions. The pooled analysis revealed that extending fixation into the upper thoracic region decreased the risk of proximal junctional kyphosis (PJK) revision surgery (RR: 0.36, 95% CI: 0.14 to 0.90; P<0.05).The operation time (WMD: 0.93;95% CI: 0.48, 1.39; P<0.05) and estimated blood loss (WMD: 0.59;95% CI: 0.33, 0.85; P<0.05) were significantly greater in the UTV group than in the LTV group. No significant differences were found in the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) pain, self-image, function, mental health, subtotal, satisfaction, or total scores; the total number of complications; or the total number of revision surgeries. Conclusion: Long posterior fixation extending into the upper thoracic region reduces the incidence of revision surgery related to PJK; however, it increased the operative level resulting in a longer operative time and greater estimated blood loss. This initial analysis indicates that extending fixation to the upper thoracic region is appropriate for patients who are likely to develop PJK following initial scoliosis correction.

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