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Data from: Variation in seasonal timing traits and life history along a latitudinal transect in Mimulus ringens

Citation

Sobel, James; Vest, Kelly (2021), Data from: Variation in seasonal timing traits and life history along a latitudinal transect in Mimulus ringens, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.nvx0k6dt8

Abstract

Seasonal timing traits are commonly under recurrent, spatially-variable selection, and are therefore predicted to exhibit clinal variation. Temperate perennial plants often require vernalization to prompt growth and reproduction; however, little is known about whether vernalization requirements change across the range of a broadly distributed species. We performed a critical vernalization duration study in Mimulus ringens, coupled with population genomic analysis. Plants from 8 populations spanning the latitudinal range were exposed to varying durations of 4°C vernalization between 0-56 days, and flowering response was assessed. RADSeq was also performed to generate 1,179 polymorphic SNPs, which were used to examine population structure. We found unexpected life history variation, with some populations lacking vernalization requirement. Population genomic analyses show that these life history variants are highly divergent from perennials, potentially revealing a cryptic species. For perennial populations, minimum vernalization time was surprisingly consistent. However, once vernalized, northern populations flowered almost 3 weeks faster than southern. Further, southern populations exhibited sensitivity to vernalization times beyond flowering competency, suggesting an ability to respond adaptively to different lengths of winter. M. ringens therefore reveals evidence of clinal variation, and provides opportunities for future studies addressing mechanistic and ecological hypotheses both within and between incipient species.

Funding

NSF, Award: DEB-1856158

NSF, Award: DEB-1856158