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Factors influencing the sustainability of homestead vegetable production intervention in Rufiji, Tanzania: A cross-sectional mixed methods study

Citation

Mlalama, Killian (2022), Factors influencing the sustainability of homestead vegetable production intervention in Rufiji, Tanzania: A cross-sectional mixed methods study, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.nzs7h44tq

Abstract

Background

There is growing evidence that home vegetable gardening interventions improve food security and nutrition outcomes at the family level. This study assessed factors influencing the sustainability of homestead vegetable production intervention, one year after the cessation of external support.

Methods

This was a cross-sectional study using both quantitative and qualitative data collection methods. A total of 247 randomly selected households that participated in the homestead vegetable intervention were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. The study held four focus group discussions with households that participated in the intervention, and four In-Depth interviews with two extension workers, one community health worker, and one agriculture district officer. Multiple logistic regression for quantitative data and thematic analysis for qualitative data was conducted.

Results

About 20.24% (50/247) of households sustained homestead vegetable production for one year after the intervention phased out. Lack of seeds (adjusted OR=1.26: CI=0.39-0.89) and either manure or fertilizers (adjusted OR=1.69: CI =1.08-2.63) were significant factors influencing the sustainability of homesteads vegetable production. In the Focus Group discussions (FGDs) and In-Depth Interview (IDIs), all participating women and extension workers reported high cost of water, destruction from free-grazing animals, agriculture pests and diseases, poor soil fertility, shortage of seeds, and lack of capital affected homestead vegetable production sustainability.

Conclusion

Existing individual, community, and system challenges influence the sustainability of external-funded agriculture and nutrition interventions. The study findings underscore the importance of community authorities, scientists, and policymakers in having a well-thought sustainability plan in all promising external-funded interventions.

Usage Notes

No missing values identified

Funding

Ifakara Health Institute