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Data from: Molecular and quantitative signatures of biparental inbreeding depression in the self-incompatible tree species Prunus avium

Citation

Jolivet, Céline; Rogge, Martin; Degen, Bernd (2012), Data from: Molecular and quantitative signatures of biparental inbreeding depression in the self-incompatible tree species Prunus avium, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.p1g31

Abstract

Genetic diversity strongly influences populations’ adaptability to changing environments and therefore survival. Sustainable forest management practices have multiple roles including conservation of genetic resources and timber production. In this study, we aimed at better understanding the variation in genetic diversity among adult and offspring individuals, and the effects of mating system on offspring survival and growth in wild cherry, Prunus avium. We analysed adult trees and open pollinated seed-families from three stands in Germany at eight microsatellite loci and one incompatibility system locus and conducted paternity analyses. Seed viability testing and seed sowing in a nursery allowed further testing for the effects of pollen donor diversity and genetic similarity between mates on the offspring performance at the seed and seedling stages. Our results were contrasting across stands. Loss of genetic diversity from adult to seedling stages and positive effect of mate diversity on offspring performance occurred in one stand only, whereas biparental inbreeding depression and significant decrease in fixation index from adults to seedlings was detected in two stands. We discussed the effects of stand genetic diversity on the magnitude of biparental inbreeding depression at several life-stages and its consequences on the management of genetic resources in P. avium.

Usage Notes

Location

Germany