Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: How much starvation, desiccation and oxygen depletion can Drosophila melanogaster tolerate before its upper thermal limits are affected?

Citation

Manenti, Tommaso; Cunha, Tomás Rocha; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Loeschcke, Volker (2018), Data from: How much starvation, desiccation and oxygen depletion can Drosophila melanogaster tolerate before its upper thermal limits are affected?, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.p307vp1

Abstract

Heat tolerance is commonly assessed as the critical thermal maximum (CTmax) using the dynamic method exposing organisms to a gradually increasing (ramping) temperature until organisms fall into a coma. The CTmax estimate is dependent on the ramping rate, with decreased rates leading to longer treatments and ultimately lower CTmax estimates. There is a current discussion surrounding the physiological dynamics of the effect of the time of exposure by temperature interaction on these estimates. Besides temperature the time of exposure to limited food (starvation), desiccation, and reduced levels of oxygen or increased levels of CO2 may, in interaction with ramping rate, act as confounding factors when assessing upper thermal limits using the dynamic method. Here we test the role of the different potentially confounding factors for assaying thermal tolerance using a ramping assay under four different ramping rates, varying from 0.01°C/min to 0.2°C/min. We find that CTmax values are higher at faster ramping rates and that oxygen or CO2 concentration does not show any negative effect on the CTmax values obtained within the experimental pre-treatment period (32h). Both water (up to 6h) and food (up to 42h) deprivation prior to assay showed a negative correlation with thermal tolerance of the flies. For both traits, we found a significant interaction with ramping rate, most likely due to prolonged assays at lower rates. However, as little water was lost during the ramping assay and as food deprivation only modestly affected CTmax values, results were very robust to the conditions experienced during the assay (even at slow rates) and mainly affected by the conditions experienced prior to performing the assay. Thus, for the most commonly applied experimental conditions CTmax estimates are unlikely to be biased or confounded by ramping rate, starvation, desiccation or deteriorating atmospheric composition.

Usage Notes