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Data from: The geographic mosaic of herbicide resistance evolution in the common morning glory, Ipomoea purpurea: evidence for resistance hotspots and low genetic differentiation across the landscape

Citation

Kuester, Adam; Chang, Shu-Mei; Baucom, Regina S. (2015), Data from: The geographic mosaic of herbicide resistance evolution in the common morning glory, Ipomoea purpurea: evidence for resistance hotspots and low genetic differentiation across the landscape, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.p3v3s

Abstract

Strong human-mediated selection via herbicide application in agroecosystems has repeatedly led to the evolution of resistance in weedy plants. Although resistance can occur among separate populations of a species across the landscape, the spatial scale of resistance in many weeds is often left unexamined. We assessed the potential that resistance to the herbicide glyphosate in the agricultural weed Ipomoea purpurea has evolved independently multiple times across its North American range. We examined both adaptive and neutral genetic variations in 44 populations of I. purpurea by pairing a replicated dose–response greenhouse experiment with SSR genotyping of experimental individuals. We uncovered a mosaic pattern of resistance across the landscape, with some populations exhibiting high-survival postherbicide and other populations showing high death. SSR genotyping revealed little evidence of isolation by distance and very little neutral genetic structure associated with geography. An approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) analysis uncovered evidence for migration and admixture among populations before the widespread use of glyphosate rather than the very recent contemporary gene flow. The pattern of adaptive and neutral genetic variations indicates that resistance in this mixed-mating weed species appears to have evolved in independent hotspots rather than through transmission of resistance alleles across the landscape.

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