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Data from: Tissue-specific changes in apoplastic proteins and cell wall structure during cold acclimation of winter wheat crowns

Citation

Willick, Ian R. et al. (2018), Data from: Tissue-specific changes in apoplastic proteins and cell wall structure during cold acclimation of winter wheat crowns, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.p65dp

Abstract

The wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) crown is the critical organ of low temperature stress survival over winter. In cold-acclimated crowns, ice formation in the apoplast causes severe tissue disruption as it grows at the expense of intracellular water. While previous crown studies have shown the vascular transition zone (VTZ) to have a higher freezing sensitivity than the shoot apical meristem (SAM), the mechanism behind the differential freezing response is not fully understood. Cooling cold-acclimated crowns to –10 °C resulted in an absence of VTZ tetrazolium chloride staining, whereas the temperatures at which 50% of the SAM stained positive and 50% of plants recovered (LT50) were similar after cold acclimation for 21 (–16 °C) and 42 d (–20 °C) at 4 °C. Proteomic analysis of the apoplastic fluids identified dehydrins, vernalization-responsive proteins, and cold shock proteins preferentially accumulated in the SAM. In contrast, modifications to the VTZ centered on increases in pathogenesis-related proteins, anti-freeze proteins, and sugar hydrolyzing enzymes. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy focal plane array analysis identified the biochemical modification of the cell wall to enhance methyl-esterified cross-linking of glucuronoarabinoxylans in the VTZ. These findings indicate that the SAM and VTZ express two distinct tissue-specific apoplastic responses during cold acclimation.

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