Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: A randomised controlled pilot study of standardised counselling and cost-free pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation among stroke and TIA patients

Citation

Papadakis, Sophia et al. (2011), Data from: A randomised controlled pilot study of standardised counselling and cost-free pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation among stroke and TIA patients, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.p67jf576

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Tobacco use is a major risk factor for recurrent stroke. Very few studies have been performed to support smoking cessation among patients who have experienced a stroke or TIA. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility and obtain preliminary data on the effectiveness of providing cost-free quit smoking pharmacotherapy and counselling to smokers identified in a stroke prevention clinic. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. METHODS: All patients seen at the Ottawa Hospital Stroke Prevention Clinic were screened for smoking status, advised to quit smoking and treated using a standardized protocol including counselling and pharmacotherapy. Eligible smokers were randomly assigned to either a prescription only usual care group, or, the experimental group who received a 4-week supply of cost-free quit smoking medications and prescription for medication renewal. All patients received follow-up counselling 7-days prior to and 5, 14, 30, 60, 90, 180 days following their quit attempt. The primary outcome was bio-chemically validated quit rates at 26-weeks. RESULTS: Of 219 smokers screened, 73 were eligible, 28 consented and were randomized, and 25 completed the study. The bio-chemically validated 7-day point prevalence abstinence rate in the experimental group compared to usual care group was 26.6% vs. 15.4%, adjusted Odds Ratio (OR) 2.00, 95% CI 0.33, 13.26, p=.20. CONCLUSIONS: This pilot study provides preliminary data which suggests the provision of 4-weeks of cost-free quit smoking medications may improve quitting success in smokers with TIA and stroke. The study was underpowered to achieve statistically significant results. It would be feasible to definitively evaluate this intervention in a large multi-site trial.

Usage Notes