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Data from: How long do anti-predator interventions remain effective? Patterns, thresholds and uncertainty

Citation

Khorozyan, Igor; Waltert, Matthias (2019), Data from: How long do anti-predator interventions remain effective? Patterns, thresholds and uncertainty, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.p6k2cb0

Abstract

Human-predator conflicts are globally widespread and effective interventions are essential to protect human assets from predator attacks. As effectiveness also has a temporal dimension, it is of importance to know how long interventions remain most effective and to determine time thresholds at which effectiveness begins to decrease. To address this, we conducted a systematic review of the temporal changes in effectiveness of non-invasive interventions against terrestrial mammalian predators, defining a temporal trend line of effectiveness for each published case. We found only 26 cases from 14 publications, mainly referring to electric fences (n = 7 cases) and deterrents (n = 7 cases). We found electric fences and calving control to remain highly effective for the longest time, reducing damage by 100% for periods between three months and three years. The effectiveness of acoustical and light deterrents, as well as guarding animals eroded quite fast after 1-5 months. Supplemental feeding was found to be counter-productive by increasing damage over time instead of reducing it. We stress that it is vital to make monitoring a routine requirement for all intervention applications and suggest to standardise periods of time over which monitoring can produce meaningful and affordable information.

Usage Notes

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: No