Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: Species richness and redundancy promote persistence of exploited mutualisms in yeast

Citation

Vidal, Mayra C. et al. (2020), Data from: Species richness and redundancy promote persistence of exploited mutualisms in yeast, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.pc866t1m6

Abstract

Mutualisms, or reciprocally beneficial interspecific interactions, constitute the foundation of many ecological communities and agricultural systems. Mutualisms come in different forms, from pairwise interactions to extremely diverse communities, and they are continually challenged with exploitation by non-mutualistic community members (exploiters). Thus, understanding how mutualisms persist remains an essential question in ecology. Theory suggests that high species richness and functional redundancy could promote mutualism persistence in complex mutualistic communities. Using a yeast system (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), we experimentally show that communities with the greatest mutualist richness and functional redundancy are nearly two times more likely to survive exploitation than are simple communities. Persistence increased because diverse communities were better able to mitigate the negative effects of competition with exploiters. Thus, large mutualistic networks may be inherently buffered from exploitation.

Methods

See supplementary materials for details on methods.

Usage Notes

Community datasheets were produced following a custom script that summarized the strain data. Scripts can be provided by request.

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: DEB 1655544