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Data from: A new method for statistical detection of directional and stabilizing mating preference

Citation

Roff, Derek A.; Fairbairn, Daphne J.; Prokuda, Alexandra (2017), Data from: A new method for statistical detection of directional and stabilizing mating preference, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.pj032

Abstract

Estimation of mating preferences is a prerequisite for understanding how sexual selection through mate choice shapes both mating systems and sexual dimorphisms. Most studies of mating preferences assay mate choice using either a no choice or a binary choice design. Binary choice trials typically employ either an artificial signal or some fixed difference (e.g. colour or size) between the signalling individuals. Although statistically more powerful than no choice designs, such experiments cannot be used to detect stabilizing preference. Further, the use of artificial signals is problematic because signal components tend to be varied in isolation, and hence do not reflect natural variation. Here, we present a new method that uses natural variation among individuals in choice trials to determine if mating preference is absent, directional, and/or stabilizing. The protocol is tested using simulation and shown to be robust to the preference function, to have the required statistical power, to be unbiased in almost all cases, and to give confidence regions that modestly overestimate the desired 95% criterion. We demonstrate the use of the method with data from mate choice trials of the sand cricket, Gryllus firmus. Software to apply this new approach is provided in Dryad.

Usage Notes

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: IOS-1353463