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Data from: Increases in the mean and variability of thermal regimes result in differential phenotypic responses among genotypes during early ontogenetic stages of lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens)

Citation

Dammerman, Kari J.; Steibel, Juan P.; Scribner, Kim T. (2016), Data from: Increases in the mean and variability of thermal regimes result in differential phenotypic responses among genotypes during early ontogenetic stages of lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens), Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.pq35t

Abstract

Climate change is affecting thermal conditions worldwide. Understanding organismal responses associated with predicted changes are essential for predicting population persistence. Few studies have examined the effects of both increased mean and variance in temperature on organismal traits, particularly during early life stages. Using lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) from Black Lake, MI, we tested whether phenotypic variation differed among families reared in two constant (10 and 18°C) and two fluctuating temperature treatments (10-19°C) representing temperatures experienced in the river and a simulated anthropogenic disturbance. Body length, body area, and yolk-sac area were quantified at hatch. Family-by-treatment interactions explained up to 50% of the variance observed among families in offspring hatch traits. Families incubated in 18°C and the fluctuating anthropogenic treatment had 6-10 times higher variance in traits than those incubated at 10°C. Hatched larvae were placed in raceways with ambient river water. Emergence body length, emergence timing, and growth were quantified upon emergence. Families differed in time to emergence and growth with the greatest range observed in the 18°C treatment. Results demonstrate that differential responses among genotypes to changes in the mean and variability of thermal incubation regimes can affect traits at hatch as well as a subsequent ontogenetic stage.

Usage Notes

Location

Michigan