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Data from: Genetic restoration in the eastern collared lizard under prescribed woodland burning

Citation

Neuwald, Jennifer L.; Templeton, Alan R. (2013), Data from: Genetic restoration in the eastern collared lizard under prescribed woodland burning, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.ps736

Abstract

Eastern collared lizards of the Ozarks live in glades—open, rocky habitats embedded in a woodland matrix. Past fire suppression had made the woodlands a barrier to dispersal, leading to habitat destruction, fragmentation and local extinction. Reintroduced populations of lizards were subjected to 10 years of habitat fragmentation under continued fire suppression followed by twelve years of landscape restoration with prescribed burns. Prior to prescribed burning, genetic diversity decreased within glades and differentiation increased among glades. With woodland burning, genetic diversity within glades first decreased during an expanding colonization phase, but then increased as a dynamically stable metapopulation was established. Population differentiation among glades also stabilized in the metapopulation under weak isolation-by-distance. This study is one of the first to examine the genetic changes in a species of conservation concern throughout all the stages of decline and recovery and shows the importance of landscape-level restoration for maintaining the genetic integrity of populations. This study also demonstrates how mark–recapture and genetic data together can yield detailed insight into metapopulation dynamics that would be impossible from just one type of data alone.

Usage Notes

Location

Ozark Mountains
Missouri