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Data from: A rat liver transcriptomic point of departure predicts a prospective liver or non-liver apical point of departure

Citation

Johnson, Kamin J.; Auerbach, Scott S.; Costa, Eduardo (2020), Data from: A rat liver transcriptomic point of departure predicts a prospective liver or non-liver apical point of departure, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.pvmcvdngd

Abstract

Identifying a toxicity point of departure (POD) is a required step in human health risk characterization of crop protection molecules, and this POD has historically been derived from apical endpoints across a battery of animal-based toxicology studies. Using rat transcriptome and apical data for 79 molecules obtained from Open TG-GATES (Toxicogenomics Project-Genomics Assisted Toxicity Evaluation System) (632 datasets), the hypothesis was tested that a short-term exposure, transcriptome-based liver biological effect POD (BEPOD) could estimate a longer-term exposure “systemic” apical endpoint POD. Apical endpoints considered were body weight, clinical observation, kidney weight and histopathology and liver weight and histopathology. A BMDExpress algorithm using Gene Ontology Biological Process gene sets was optimized to derive a liver BEPOD most predictive of a systemic apical POD. Liver BEPODs were stable from 3 hours to 29 days of exposure; the median fold difference of the 29 day BEPOD to BEPODs from earlier time points was approximately 1 (range of 0.7-1.1). Strong positive correlation (Pearson R = 0.86) and predictive accuracy (root mean square difference = 0.41) were observed between a concurrent (29 day) liver BEPOD and the systemic apical POD. Similar Pearson R and root mean square difference values were observed for comparisons between a 29 day systemic apical POD and liver BEPODs derived from 3 hours to 15 days of exposure. These data across 79 molecules suggest that a longer-term exposure study apical POD from liver and non-liver compartments can be estimated using a liver BEPOD derived from an acute or subacute exposure study.

Funding

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

NIEHS

National Institutes of Health

NIH, Award: ES103318-03