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Data from: A major shift in diversification rate helps explain macroevolutionary patterns in primate species diversity

Citation

Arbour, Jessica H.; Santana, Sharlene E. (2017), Data from: A major shift in diversification rate helps explain macroevolutionary patterns in primate species diversity, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.q51ph

Abstract

Primates represent one of the most species rich, wide ranging and ecologically diverse clades of mammals. What major macroevolutionary factors have driven their diversification and contributed to the modern distribution of primate species remains widely debated. We employed phylogenetic comparative methods to examine the role of clade age and evolutionary rate heterogeneity in the modern distribution of species diversity of Primates. Primate diversification has accelerated since its origin, with decreased extinction leading to a shift to even higher evolutionary rates in the most species rich family (Cercopithecidae). Older primate clades tended to be more diverse, however a shift in evolutionary rate was necessary to adequately explain the imbalance in species diversity. Species richness was also poorly explained by geographic distribution, especially once clade age and evolutionary rate shifts were accounted for, and may relate instead to other ecological factors. The global distribution of primate species diversity appears to have been strongly impacted by heterogeneity in evolutionary rates.

Usage Notes

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: 1557125