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Data from: Pollinator shifts, contingent evolution, and evolutionary constraint drive floral disparity in Salvia (Lamiaceae): evidence from morphometrics and phylogenetic comparative methods

Citation

Kriebel, Ricardo et al. (2020), Data from: Pollinator shifts, contingent evolution, and evolutionary constraint drive floral disparity in Salvia (Lamiaceae): evidence from morphometrics and phylogenetic comparative methods, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.q573n5tg5

Abstract

Switches in pollinators have been argued to be key drivers of floral evolution in angiosperms. However, few studies have tested the relationship between floral shape evolution and switches in pollination in large clades. In concert with a dated phylogeny, we present a morphometric analysis of corolla, anther connective, and style shape across 44% of nearly 1,000 species of Salvia (Lamiaceae) and test four hypotheses of floral evolution. We demonstrate that floral morphospace of New World (NW) Salvia is largely distinct from that of Old World (OW) Salvia and that these differences are pollinator driven; that shifts in floral morphology sometimes mirror shifts in pollinators; that anther connectives (key constituents of the Salvia staminal lever) and styles co-evolved from curved to linear shapes following shifts from bee to bird pollination; and that morphological differences between NW and OW bee flowers are partly the legacy of constraints imposed by an earlier shift to bird pollination in the NW. The distinctive staminal lever in Salvia is a morphologically diverse structure that has evolved in concert with both the corolla and style, under different pollinator pressures, and in contingent fashion.

Methods

This data set was collected by scanning live plants and searching for illustrations of floral parts of the genus Salvia and relatives. These scans and illustrations were then outlined using the image processing sofware GIMP for further analysis. The script to run the analysis is provided.

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: DEB-1655606