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Data from: A study of the transit amplification divisions during spermatogenesis in Oncopeltus fasciatus to assess plasticity in sperm numbers or sperm viability under different diets

Citation

Duxbury, Ashley E.; Weathersby, Brandie; Sanchez, Zachary; Moore, Patricia J. (2019), Data from: A study of the transit amplification divisions during spermatogenesis in Oncopeltus fasciatus to assess plasticity in sperm numbers or sperm viability under different diets, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.q57n9h7

Abstract

Oncopeltus fasciatus males fed the ancestral diet of milkweed seeds prioritize reproduction over lifespan as evidenced by higher rates of fertility and shorter lifespans than males from the same population fed the adapted diet of sunflower seeds. We examined the proximate mechanisms by which milkweed-fed males maintained late-life fertility. We tested the hypothesis that older milkweed-fed males maintained fertility by producing more, higher quality sperm. Our results, that older males have more sperm, but their sperm do not have higher viability, is in general agreement with other recent studies on how nutrition affects male fertility in insects. We further examined the mechanisms by which sperm are produced by examining the progression of spermatogonial cells through the cell cycle during the transit amplification divisions. We demonstrated that diet affects the likelihood of a spermatocyst being in the S-phase or M-phase of the cell cycle. Given work in model systems, these results have implications for subtle effects on sperm quality either through replication stress or epigenetic markers. Thus, viability may not be the best marker for sperm quality and more work is called for on the mechanisms by which the germline and the production of sperm mediate the cost of reproduction.

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