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Analysis of acoustic index against temperature and barometric pressure

Citation

Karlsson, Catharina; Tay, Harold; Yambun, Paul; Hughes, Alice (2021), Analysis of acoustic index against temperature and barometric pressure , Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.q83bk3jj0

Abstract

1. New low-cost options to long-term acoustic monitoring in terrestrial ecology are becoming increasingly available. However, integration of acoustic stations with sensors for logging of additional data, such as temperature and barometric pressure is rare. Separate environmental loggers often come at a cost of > US$100 whereas the same sensors for use with microprocessors come at a cost between US$. 1-15 The cost savings integration entails as well as the crucial need for the recording of some of these variables in acoustic studies mean that this is an important development avenue.

2. Overcoming these issues is important to enable insights into the long-term dynamics of ecological systems and how they respond to changes in the environment at varying temporal scales and is especially important for studies involving species that are microclimate dependent.

3. Here we present a hardware system for both acoustic and environmental data logging where the board design is released under a creative commons license. The system has been field tested in a tropical setting and is called the Kinabalu Recorder. The presented configuration came at a cost of less than US$100 per station. This cost is for professional manufacture and assembly of the boards, temperature and barometric sensor, two batteries, water-proof housing and two 64 GB micro SD cards.

4. The system has been extensively tested in a tropical setting along an altitude gradient and with over 1.3 TB of data (> 2,000 hours of data with over 10 months in the field) presents a robust solution to long term acoustic monitoring integrated with environmental data sensors.

5. Work on hardware and software systems are an important part of the technological development of field biology as it allows greater flexibility in terms of cost and configuration of systems whilst promoting cross-field collaboration and information flow.

Methods

This data was collected using the Kinabalu Recorder in Kinabalu Park, Malaysia, a station for acoustic and abiotic environmental recording. The data was then processed in the software R and the bioacoustic index and normalised difference index was extracted. The data contained is from March until September 2020. The data was used for figures and mixed model analysis in the MEE manuscript.

Usage Notes

There are missing values as these stations were field tested during the 2020 pandemic and movement control orders in Malaysia interrupted the schedule for battery replacement.

Funding

PIFI Fellowship, Award: ECMKarlsson

Chinese Postdoctoral Science Foundation, Award: Y2BSH11B21

National Natural Science Foundation of China, Award: U1602265

Chinese Academy of Sciences, Award: XDA20050202

High-End Foreign Experts Program of Yunnan Province, Award: Y9YN021B01

Chinese Academy of Sciences, Award: Y4ZK111B01

Southeast Asian Atlas of Biodiversity, Award: Y5ZK121B01

Mapping Karst Biodiversity in Yunnan, Award: Y7GJ021B01

PIFI Fellowship, Award: ECMKarlsson

High-End Foreign Experts Program of Yunnan Province, Award: Y9YN021B01

Southeast Asian Atlas of Biodiversity, Award: Y5ZK121B01

Mapping Karst Biodiversity in Yunnan, Award: Y7GJ021B01