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Data for: Whole Animal Feed FLat (WAFFL): A complete and comprehensive validation of a novel high-throughput fly experimentation system

Citation

Ludington, William; Jaime, Maria (2022), Data for: Whole Animal Feed FLat (WAFFL): A complete and comprehensive validation of a novel high-throughput fly experimentation system, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.q83bk3jmt

Abstract

Non-mammalian model organisms have been essential for our understanding of the mechanisms that control development, disease, and physiology, but they are underutilized in pharmacological and toxicological phenotypic screening assays due to their low throughput in comparison with cell-based screens. To increase the utility of using Drosophila melanogaster in screening, we designed the Whole Animal Feeding FLat (WAFFL), a novel, flexible, and complete system for feeding, monitoring, and assaying flies in a high-throughput format. Our 3-D printed system is compatible with inexpensive and readily available, commercial 96-well plate consumables and equipment. Experimenters can change the diet at will during the experiment and video record for behavior analysis, enabling precise dosing, measurement of feeding, and analysis of behavior in 96-well plate format. 

Methods

Data was collected using the WAFFL and MUFFIN methods presented in the article.

Data are provided that allow the main figures to be recapitulated, including the following:

1. Fly survival data

2. Fly food consumption data

3. A very large file of fly movements in the WAFFL-MUFFIN device

4. An accompanying movie of fly movements in the WAFFL-MUFFIN device.

See the README.md file for specifics of the datasets.

Usage Notes

The file WAFFL-MUFFINoutput_smoothed_data.txt needs to be opened using a text editor or in the terminal. Any other software (i.e. excel, numbers, etc) will truncate the data to the software limits (~65,000 rows).

Funding

NSF IOS, Award: 2032985

NSF IOS, Award: 2144342

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Award: R01DK128454

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Award: Intramural Research Program of the NIH

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Award: Intramural Research Program of the NIH

RCSA and Allen Foundation, Award: SCIALOG 27912

Carnegie Institution of Canada, Award: Grant to Ludington and Sivak

Carnegie Institution for Science, Award: Endowment Support