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Data from: Why hate the good guy? Antisocial punishment of high cooperators is greater when people compete to be chosen

Citation

Pleasant, Aleta; Barclay, Pat (2018), Data from: Why hate the good guy? Antisocial punishment of high cooperators is greater when people compete to be chosen, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.q88sm

Abstract

When choosing social partners, people prefer good cooperators (all else equal). Given this preference, anyone wishing to be chosen can either increase their own cooperation to become more desirable, or suppress others’ cooperation to make them less desirable. Previous research shows that very cooperative people sometimes get punished (“antisocial punishment”) or criticized (“do-gooder derogation”) in many cultures. Here we use a public goods game with punishment to test whether antisocial punishment is used as a means of competing to be chosen by suppressing others’ cooperation. As predicted, there was more antisocial punishment when participants were competing to be chosen for a subsequent cooperative task (a Trust Game) than without a subsequent task. This difference in antisocial punishment cannot be explained by differences in contributions, moralistic punishment, or confusion. This suggests that antisocial punishment is a social strategy that low cooperators use to avoid looking bad when high cooperators escalate cooperation.

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