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Data from: Nanotransfection-based vasculogenic cell reprogramming drives functional recovery in a mouse model of ischemic stroke

Citation

Lemmerman, Luke et al. (2021), Data from: Nanotransfection-based vasculogenic cell reprogramming drives functional recovery in a mouse model of ischemic stroke, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.qrfj6q5dw

Abstract

Ischemic stroke causes vascular and neuronal tissue deficiencies that could lead to significant functional impairment and/or death. Although progenitor-based vasculogenic cell therapies have shown promise as a potential rescue strategy following ischemic stroke, current approaches face major hurdles. Here we used fibroblasts nanotransfected with Etv2, Foxc2, and Fli1 (EFF), to drive reprogramming-based vasculogenesis, intracranially, as a potential therapy for ischemic stroke. Perfusion analyses suggest that intracranial delivery of EFF-nanotransfected fibroblasts led to a dose-dependent increase in perfusion 14 days post-injection. MRI and behavioral tests revealed ~70% infarct resolution and up to ~90% motor recovery for mice treated with EFF-nanotransfected fibroblasts. Immunohistological analysis confirmed increases in vascularity and neuronal cellularity, as well as reduced glial scar formation in response to treatment with EFF-nanotransfected fibroblasts. Altogether, our results suggest that vasculogenic cell therapies based on nanotransfection-driven (i.e., non-viral) cellular reprogramming represent a promising strategy for the treatment of ischemic stroke.

Funding

National Institutes of Health, Award: DP2EB028110

National Institutes of Health, Award: R21NS099869

National Institutes of Health, Award: P30-NS045758

National Institutes of Health, Award: R01NS085272

National Institutes of Health, Award: R01NS042617