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Data from: Simulating effects of fitness and dispersal on the use of Trojan sex chromosomes for invasive species management

Citation

Day, Casey et al. (2020), Data from: Simulating effects of fitness and dispersal on the use of Trojan sex chromosomes for invasive species management, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.qv9s4mwb9

Abstract

  1. The use of Trojan Y Chromosomes (TYC) for controlling invasive species involves manipulating the sex chromosomes of captive-raised individuals. Once released, the offspring of these individuals consist of only one sex, thereby skewing the sex-ratio of the invasive population and potentially leading to eradication. Simulation models are needed that can inform managers on how to maximize the likelihood of species eradication, since implementation of this novel management approach in the field is still rare.
  2. Here, we present the first spatially explicit, mechanistic simulation model of a real-world TYC program for invasive species eradication. Using a brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) system model, we investigated the effects of competitive and reproductive fitness of the captive-raised YY males, dispersal behavior upon their release, and landscape heterogeneity on eradication success.
  3. Likelihood of eradication was dependent on both the competitive and reproductive fitness of the Trojan individuals. Competitive fitness (i.e., survival) had a higher threshold for eradication, below which populations failed to be eradicated.
  4. Movement ecology of both the wild and YY male populations was important for eradication. Under a restricted dispersal scenario for YY males following their release, the wild population was not extirpated but maintained a stable, yet reduced, population size. In terms of landscape configuration, time to eradication of local patches increased with greater connectivity within the stream network.
  5. In addition to sex ratio distortion, density-dependent mortality resulting from outplantings made an important contribution to eradication and therefore may also affect native competitors.
  6. While our results indicate that eradication is possible, maximizing its likelihood requires an understanding of the fitness and movement ecology of both the wild and YY male populations of the invasive species. Both our model and the principles derived from this study related to fitness and behavioral landscape ecology can be broadly applied to other invaded species and systems.

Methods

These data include inputs and outputs to the program CDMetaPOP version 1.40 (https://github.com/ComputationalEcologyLab/CDMetaPOP). Summary files that describe model output are also included. An additional excel file is included that details results from the connectivity measures and their relationship with patch occupancy.

Usage Notes

See readme files for explanations of each data set.

Funding

National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Award: NNX14AC91G

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