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Direct and indirect effects of noise pollution alter biological communities in and near noise-exposed environments

Citation

Senzaki, Masayuki; Kadoya, Taku; Francis, Clinton (2020), Direct and indirect effects of noise pollution alter biological communities in and near noise-exposed environments, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.qz612jmb1

Abstract

Noise pollution is pervasive across every ecosystem on Earth. Although decades of research have documented a variety of negative impacts of noise to organisms, key gaps remain, such as how noise affects different taxa within a biological community and how effects of noise propagate across space. We experimentally applied traffic noise pollution to multiple roadless areas and quantified the impacts of noise on birds, grasshoppers, and odonates. We show that acoustically-oriented birds have reduced species richness and abundance and different community compositions in experimentally noise-exposed areas relative to comparable quiet locations. We also found both acoustically-oriented grasshoppers and odonates without acoustic receptors to have reduced species richness and/or abundance in relatively quiet areas that abut noise-exposed areas. These results suggest that noise pollution not only affects acoustically-oriented animals, but that noise may reverberate through biological communities through indirect effects to those with no clear links to the acoustic realm, even in adjacent quiet environments.