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Data from: The role of the environment in the evolution of tolerance and resistance to a pathogen

Citation

Zeller, Michael; Koella, Jacob Conrad (2017), Data from: The role of the environment in the evolution of tolerance and resistance to a pathogen, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.r1s5d

Abstract

Defense against parasites can be divided into resistance, which limits parasite burden, and tolerance, which reduces pathogenesis at a given parasite burden. Distinguishing between the two and understanding which defense is favored by evolution in different ecological settings are important, as they lead to fundamentally different evolutionary trajectories of host-parasite interactions. We let the mosquito Aedes aegypti evolve under different food levels and with either no parasite, a constant parasite, or a coevolving parasite (the microsporidian Vavraia culicis). We then tested tolerance and resistance of the evolved lines on a population level at the two food levels. Exposure to parasites during evolution increased resistance and tolerance, but there were no differences between the lines evolved with coevolving or constant parasites. Mosquitoes that had evolved with food restriction had higher resistance than those evolved with high food but similar tolerance. The mosquitoes that had restricted food when being tested had lower tolerance than those with normal food, but there was no difference in resistance. Our results emphasize the complexity and dependence on environmental conditions of the evolution and expression of resistance and tolerance and help to evaluate some of the predictions about the evolution of host defense against parasites.

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