Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: Experimental evolution of female traits under different levels of intersexual conflict in Drosophila melanogaster

Citation

Nandy, Bodhisatta et al. (2013), Data from: Experimental evolution of female traits under different levels of intersexual conflict in Drosophila melanogaster, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.r54m2

Abstract

A number of studies have documented the evolution of female resistance to mate harm in response to the alteration of intersexual conflict in the populations. However, the life-history consequence of such evolution is still a subject of debate. In the present study, we subjected replicate populations of Drosophila melanogaster to different levels of sexual conflict (generated by altering the operational sex ratio) for over 45 generations. Our results suggest that females from populations experiencing higher level of intersexual conflict evolved increased resistance to mate harm, in terms of both longevity and progeny production. Females from the populations with low conflict were significantly heavier at eclosion and were more susceptible to mate harm in terms of progeny production under continuous exposure to the males. However, these females produced more progeny upon single mating and had significantly higher longevity in absence of any male exposure – a potential evidence of trade-offs between resistance-related traits and other life-history traits, such as fecundity and longevity. We also report tentative evidence, suggesting an increased male cost of interacting with more resistant females.

Usage Notes