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Data from: The role of inbreeding depression and mating system in the evolution of heterostyly

Citation

Weber, Jennifer J. et al. (2013), Data from: The role of inbreeding depression and mating system in the evolution of heterostyly, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.r6209

Abstract

We investigated the role of morph-based differences in the expression of inbreeding depression in loss of the mid-styled morph from populations of tristylous Oxalis alpina as proposed by theoretical analyses. The extent of self-compatibility of reproductive morphs, the degree of self-fertilization, and the magnitude of inbreeding depression were investigated in three populations of O. alpina differing in their tristylous incompatibility relationships. All three populations exhibited significant inbreeding depression. In two populations with highly modified tristylous incompatibility, manifested as increased reciprocal compatibility between short- and long-styled morphs, substantial self-compatibility and self-fertilization of mid-styled morphs was detected, and expected to result in expression of inbreeding depression in the progeny of mid-styled morphs in the natural populations. In contrast, significant self-fertility of the mid-styled morph was absent from the population with typical tristylous incompatibility, and no self-fertilization could be detected. Although self-fertilization and expression of inbreeding depression should result in selection against the mid-styled morph in the later stages of the transition from tristyly to distyly, in O. alpina selection against the mid-styled morph in the early phases of the evolution of distyly is likely due to genic selection against mid alleles associated with modified tristylous incompatibility, rather than expression of inbreeding depression.

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